Category: Geography & Mapping

  • Mapping and Geocoding, Part 3: Vilmorin’s Floriculture Data Set

    Mapping and Geocoding, Part 3: Vilmorin’s Floriculture Data Set

    Outdoor Flower Markets: A Network of Commercial Sites near Public Squares Primary source. The French botanist and writer Philippe L. de Vilmorin authored Les fleurs à Paris: culture et commerce (The Flowers of Paris: Culture and Commerce) in 1892. Vilmorin provides a history of the Parisian floriculture industry that parses out the supply and distribution […]

  • Mapping and Geocoding, Part 4: Business Directory Data Set

    Mapping and Geocoding, Part 4: Business Directory Data Set

    Florists: A Network of Commercial Sites near the City Center and the Grands Boulevards Primary source. The French firm Didot–Bottin published an annual business directory for Paris akin to today’s phonebooks. The directory includes entries for a variety of commercial sites such as florists, horticulturalists, seed sellers, and glasshouse vendors. I use the entry for […]

  • Mapping and Geocoding, Part 1: Visualizing Parisian Horticultural Networks

    Mapping and Geocoding, Part 1: Visualizing Parisian Horticultural Networks

    The Big Idea: Art | Gender | Plants | Urbanism | Movement | Networks | Power Structures | Ecologies Why use mapping and historical geocoding to visualize data? I use mapping and historical geocoding to enhance close readings of five paintings by Paris-based artists of the 1870s. By combining traditional art historical approaches with methodologies drawn from geography and urban studies, I […]

  • Unsettling Colonial Mapping: Sonic-Spatial Representations of amiskwaciwâskahikan

    Unsettling Colonial Mapping: Sonic-Spatial Representations of amiskwaciwâskahikan

    Originally featured on the femlab blog (a feminist exhibition space on the University of Alberta campus): https://ualbertafemlab.wordpress.com/ Unsettling Colonial Mapping: Sonic-Spatial Representations of amiskwaciwâskahikan This project is supported by the Digital Rights Community Grant Program, a partnership between Digital Justice Lab, Tech Reset Canada and Centre for Digital Rights. This map is a sonic exploration and representation […]

  • Rhetorical Spaces and Places

    Rhetorical Spaces and Places

    Greetings, I’m Christopher Peace, a Ph.D. student at the University of Kansas. I’m very new to HASTAC Scholars, and somewhat to digital humanities at large. I’m currently finishing course work in the rhetoric and composition department, and I’m interested in African American folklore and the rhetoric of space and place. To me, investigating how places […]

  • Situating Paintings of Women and Horticulture in Local and Global Historical Contexts

    Situating Paintings of Women and Horticulture in Local and Global Historical Contexts

    My name is Kristan Hanson and I am a PhD candidate in art history at the University of Kansas. As a new HASTAC Scholar, I have been asked to share my research with members of my cohort and the broader community. So, here’s my first blog post! What? My dissertation examines paintings of women and […]

  • Day of Digital Humanities 2018 at Carleton College — Recap

    Day of Digital Humanities 2018 at Carleton College — Recap

    On Friday, June 1, Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota hosted the third annual Day of Digital Humanities. Day of DH is a free regional conference for faculty, staff, and students involved with digital humanities in a variety of ways. As we start a new academic year, revisit our conference from the beginning of summer! Excited […]

  • Digital Humanities & Methods: Mapping Social Networks and Indigenous Legal Culture in Colonial Mexico

    Digital Humanities & Methods: Mapping Social Networks and Indigenous Legal Culture in Colonial Mexico

    About a year ago, I became interested in mapping as a research tool. Since then, I have met and talked to many other graduate students, professors, and researchers who work on amazing projects. We shared ideas, plans, (and beers), and talked about difficulties and problems we encountered in our work.  There are so many interesting […]

  • Empty Spaces?: Indigenous Peoples and Euro-American Maps of the Colonial Southwest

    In my research on eighteenth-century Spanish Louisiana and Texas, I ask how ethnicity and race shaped discourses on migration and border-security. I examine how Spanish officials engaged native communities as border patrols to control Anglo-American immigration, while at the same time recruiting European immigrants to infringe on native territories. When I started this research last […]

  • When Historians go to a Geographer’s Conference…

    We all like to talk about interdisciplinary work. In fact, “interdisciplinary” (or even better: “transdisciplinary”) is a buzzword that PhD students are advised to sprinkle over their grant applications. As a second-year PhD student in history, I found myself intrigued by the many promises of interdisciplinary work. Yet… when it came to implementing those theoretical […]